This Thanksgiving, Peace is Loud remembered the stories of the Native American people whose lands we are on through the eyes of women of color dedicated to reminding us of the vibrant cultures that colonialism has failed to destroy.

We featured the poem “National Anthem” by Amy Quichiz alongside the painting “An Invitation AP 3/3” by Favianna Rodriguez.

Amy Quichiz received her bachelor’s degree at Syracuse University majoring in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology. Throughout her college career, she has been known for her commitment to continuously bring awareness to the Latinx community and fighting against gender violence, sexual assault, gender and sexual inequality, queer discriminations and racial issues.

Amy also articulates theories and personal experiences into writing pieces that cover various topics such as whiteness, radical self-love from brown girls, mental disabilities in Latinx households, Latinx body issues, borderland identities and radical queer love. Her work has been recognized by numerous of platforms such as The New York Times, Bustle, Bon Appetit, i-D, Self Magazine, Mic, and VegNews. Through Instagram, Amy has the opportunity to continue sharing knowledge through radical story-telling and creating workshops for throughout the community.

Lastly, Amy is the Founder of Veggie Mijas, a women of color collective that highlights the importance of veganism through lens of those with marginalized identities. Through this collective, she has opened new chapters in several states and cities and is organizing vegan folks of color in a national perspective. Amy also provides resources for folks in these cities on how their food can be more accessible and to learn more
about the food system.

Favianna Rodriguez is an interdisciplinary artist, cultural strategist, and social justice activist based in Oakland, California. Her art and praxis address migration, economic inequality, gender justice, sexual freedom and ecology. Her practice boldly reshapes the myths, ideas, and cultural practices of the present, while confronting the wounds of the past. Favianna’s works serve as a record of her human experiences as a woman of color confronting interlocking cultural traditions and biases, while embracing joy, freedom and complexity as an antidote to the the life-long impacts of systemic inequality. Her signature mark-making embodies the perspective of a first-generation American Latinx artist with Afro-Latinx roots who grew up in working-class Oakland, California during the birth of internet, and in the midst of an era of anti-immigrant hate and the war on drugs.

As part of her practice, Favianna leads art interventions around the United States. Her artistic modalities include social practice, visual art, arts advocacy and institution building . Favianna collaborates deeply with social movements to co-create visual narratives and cultural strategies that are resilient and transformative. In addition to her expansive studio practices, she is the Executive Director of CultureStrike, a national arts organization that empowers artists to dream big, disrupt the status quo, and envision a truly just world rooted in shared humanity. In 2016, Favianna received the Robert Rauschenberg Artist as Activist Fellowship for her work around immigrant detention and mass incarceration. In 2017, she was awarded an Atlantic Fellowship for Racial Equity for her work around racial justice and climate change. In 2018, she began organizing with artists in the entertainment industry through 5050by2020.com, an initiative launched by Jill Soloway to build intersectional artist power.